Disclaimer:  While the information, advice and services given by Arid Spirit and its practitioners may give relief and support to medical, physical and/or psychiatric situations, it is not intended to take the place of medical doctors or mental health professionals as we are neither doctors nor mental health professionals.  By partaking of any or all of our programs, you agree that you are wholly responsible for your actions and your being and do not hold Arid Spirit or its practitioners liable to you for any act or failure to act that you may decide because of information provided to you in-person or via telephonic, electronic, or other means.

© 2019 Arid Spirit.  All rights reserved.

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Labyrinth

Labyrinths have been around for thousands of years.  Often mistaken for mazes, which are designed to trap and confuse, labyrinths are designed to calm and clarify.  They achieve this by having only one path, one way in and one way out.  

 

It is believed that their original purpose was to symbolize the pilgrimage to holy sites and lands for those who were unable to travel the distance for one reason or another.  Modern mystics use labyrinths to help them achieve a contemplative state. Walking among the turnings, one loses track of direction and of the outside world, and thus quiets the mind. 

 

Many newly-made labyrinths exist today, in churches and parks.  Arid Spirit will soon have an indoor labyrinth for our guests.  In the meantime, The Labyrinth Society has a listing of labyrinths available world wide. 

Lauren Artress, founder of Veriditas,

answers questions about the labyrinth

Lissa Coffey of Coffey Talk speaks more

about walking the labyrinth